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From
Just Small Trees, LLC
Paul Nystrom
2474 Walnut St. #155
Cary, NC 27518
US
To
Nisha.Mistry
7008 Copperleaf Ct
Cary, 27519
Date
October 6, 2020
Invoice Number
18889
Invoice Due
December 1, 2020
Invoice Total
$260.00
Balance
$260.00
  1. Task
    Rate
    Qty
    %
    Amount

    ASSESSMENT RESULTS BELOW FOR REFERENCE:

    ASSESSMENT Performed 9/23/2020. Directions as looking out from the house to the backyard. Backyard has Southwest sun exposure.

    Magnolia – Front by gate, left side. Severe infestation by scale insect (Magnolia Scale, Neolecanium cornuparvum) leading to droppings that black mold (“sooty mold”) grows from. Scale insects take a lot of energy from the tree causing it to decline over time.
    Magnolia – Further back, lower section of this tree same as above
    TREATMENT: $50 Spray both trees with Sevin insecticide before the end of September. Good timing now. Product is available at garden centers, so homeowner can do the same. Just be sure to follow label directions. I normally don’t like using strong insecticides first, but these trees have heavy scale infestations.

    Magnolia – Far back, middle area. Thin growth. No emitters in irrigation tubing running across root ball. Pine straw mulch is thin.
    TREATMENT: $? Add emitters to irrigation tubing. Fertilize in early spring with slow-release fertilizer. Add mulch.

    Arizona Cypress (Cupressus arizonica, ‘Carolina Sapphire’) – Left side, rear. Juniper Tip Blight (it also affects Cypress) causing dead needles and branches.
    Treatment 1: $50 Late fall – Early spring, shake tree to loosen as many dead needles as possible, cut out any dead branches, rake up all mulch and fallen leaves and dispose of off-site. Replace with fresh mulch.
    Treatment 2: $120 ($40/spray) – Spray with fungicide in Spring as leaves start to emerge, and on 14-21 day intervals to cover prime fungal growth period. This is an off-label use and may not be helpful depending on which fungus is the cause.
    Treatment 3: If the browning jumps to the neighboring Arizona Cypress, this Cypress should be removed as soon as possible and all infected branches on the neighboring tree pruned off, as well as the mulch removed on both trees and replaced with fresh mulch. What you don’t want to have happen is the disease move across and spread through all the other Arizona Cypress trees you have.

    Arizona Cypress – Back, middle. One brown branch. Looks like it died naturally.
    TREATMENT: $0 cut out branch and dispose.

    Arborvitae (Thuja sp, probably ‘Green Giant’) – Far back, left. Yellowish foliage and lower branches turned brown. Outermost Arborvitae in area with Southwest exposure, will be getting full amount of sun and heat. Drip emitters are buried, so assuming the same setup as the Arborvitae I removed a few weeks ago. (2) red Netafim CNL “8” emitters 5/8″ diameter. Per homeowner, irrigation system runs 3 times a week (Sun, Wed, Fri) for 17 minutes each time. Each tree has 2(?) emitters. This is 3*17*2 = 102 minutes of irrigation time per tree per week. The emitter is most likely an 8 liters per hour emitter or 2 gallons per hour. This means each tree receives approximately 1.1 gallons per time or 3.4 gallons of water per week. A 10 foot tall Arborvitae assuming 1″ of water per week over a diameter equal to the tree height. This is 1 inch of water over 79 square feet or 6.5 cubic feet of water per week. 7.5 gallons per cubic feet = 49 gallons of water per week.

    Overall, the tree needs 49 gallons of water per week and the irrigation system delivers 3.4 gallons, the rest coming from rain. (This is an idealized scenario. If we assume the tree can get by with even 12 gallons per week and perhaps the irrigation system with runoff from other trees is delivering 6 gallons per week, there is still a large gap.)

    TREATMENT: $? Add 2 emitters per Arborvitae to the trees on the Southwest edge. Change irrigation schedule from 17 minutes 3 times per week to 26 minutes 2 times per week so that the water delivered soaks deeper in the ground and encourages deeper root growth. Check for leaks in the system while it is running and plug them up or put emitters in their place. Confirm drip emitter size by having it drip into a container and measuring the amount of liquid over a certain amount of time. Irrigation provider may have guidance as well.

    Arborvitae – Middle section of back, fairly random browning in leaf tips throughout. This looks like Arborvitae Needle Blight caused by Phyllosticta thujae or Pestalotiopsis.
    TREATMENT 1: $40 Prune out all tips that look like they have infections on them. This will have to be done by hand. Dispose of debris off site.
    TREATMENT 2: (If treating Arizona Cypress above with fungicide spray, include this tree at an additional $15/per spray, so both trees would be $165 for three sprays or $55/per spray)

    Juniper shrub – Back, right. Low growing Juniper with brown branches here and there. Juniper Tip Blight either Phomopsis juniperovora or Kabatina juniperi, likely Kabatina based on the timing.
    TREATMENT: $30 Cut out brown tips and any dead branches and dispose off-site. Plant value doesn’t justify spraying a fungicide in this case.

    —– OTHER ISSUES —–

    (4) Waxmyrtle – Far back, center. 4 large shrubs, completely dead. Remove.
    TREATMENT 1: $80 Tops only removed, stumps cut low, dispose of debris.
    or TREATMENT 2: $160 Tops removed, stumps dug out of the ground, holes filled with nearby soil, dispose of debris.

    Saplings – (6) Pine 9′ x 1-2″, (1) Oak 9′ x 2″, (2) Sweetgum – will get large over time and compete for resources
    TREATMENT: $50 Remove all saplings with “stumps” dug up, dispose of debris

    —– LONG TERM —–

    Some issues possible as trees grow up and together to form privacy wall as airflow is restricted by dense foliage. Arizona Cypress are more prone to developing Tip Blight in this state combined with the high humidity of the region. Something to keep track of. They are also considerably more drought tolerant than the Arborvitae, so balancing water could be an issue.

    Smaller shrubs like Wax Myrtles will continue to thin out as they are outgrown by neighboring trees. Remove individual shrubs as they reach a point of decline.

    Don’t fertilize unless specific issues indicate a lack of fertilization. Maintain mulch to provide organic matter to the soil.

    $0
    1
    0%
    $0
  2. Service
    Price
    %
    Amount

    (2) Magnolias with Magnolia scale insects – TREATMENT: $50 Spray both trees with Sevin insecticide before the end of September. Sprayed at rate of 4oz/gallon.

    COMPLETED 10/5/2020

    $50
    0%
    $50
  3. (4) Waxmyrtle – Far back, center. 4 large shrubs, completely dead. Remove.
    TREATMENT 1: $80 Tops only removed, stumps cut low, dispose of debris.
    or TREATMENT 2: $160 Tops removed, stumps dug out of the ground, holes filled with nearby soil, dispose of debris.

    IN PROGRESS

    [DRIP IRRIGATION HOSE WITH MULTIPLE HOLES – WIDESPREAD?]

    $160
    0%
    $160
  4. Saplings – (6) Pine 9′ x 1-2″, (1) Oak 9′ x 2″, (2) Sweetgum – will get large over time and compete for resources
    TREATMENT: $50 Remove all saplings with “stumps” dug up, dispose of debris

    IN PROGRESS

    $50
    0%
    $50
Subtotal $260.00
Total $260.00

Notes

Thank you.

Terms

Payment is due upon work completion.

Updated
October 6, 2020 @ 5:56 PM

Invoice updated by treebort.

Updated
October 6, 2020 @ 5:56 PM

Invoice updated by treebort.

Updated
October 24, 2020 @ 7:29 PM

Invoice updated by treebort.